CLINICAL ISOLATES OF E.coli IN PIGS – ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AND PERSPECTIVES TO OPTIMIZE ANTIBIOTIC ADMINISTRATION
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Keywords

antibiotics
resistance
bacteriocins
pig farming

How to Cite

1.
Stojanov I, Prodanov Radulović J, Lauková A, Grešáková Ľuba, Petrović J, Ratajac R, Pušić I. CLINICAL ISOLATES OF E.coli IN PIGS – ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE AND PERSPECTIVES TO OPTIMIZE ANTIBIOTIC ADMINISTRATION. AVM [Internet]. 2020 Dec. 31 [cited 2021 Oct. 25];13(2):17-2. Available from: https://niv.ns.ac.rs/e-avm/index.php/e-avm/article/view/242

Abstract

Modern livestock production inevitably involves the use of antimicrobial drugs. Adequate application thereof depends on the application of appropriate biosafety measures as well as timely and accurate diagnostics of the diseases. Administration of antimicrobial drugs without previous identification of “zootechnical errors” or relevant laboratory analysis may lead to the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Surveillance and monitoring of AMR is conducted according to prescribed procedures and includes sampling at slaughter line. Quite often, such procedures are missed out during production cycle, which results in an inadequate use of antibiotics and consequent development of antimicrobial resistance and resistance gene transfer. In this research, we monitored the presence of specific bacterial species from the family Enterobacteriaceae and their sensitivity to particular antibiotics in diverse animal categories at pig farms over the breeding period. The aim of the study was to establish the following: development of antimicrobial resistance by isolated bacteria, occurrence of the resistance towards several diverse groups of antibiotics, and possible alternatives to antibiotics in cases when therapy is required. The research confirmed the development of AMR during pig production process, which is often manifested as multiple resistance (group of penicillin and synthetic penicillin drugs, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines).

https://doi.org/10.46784/eavm.v13i2.242
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