POTENTIAL OF DIFFERENT MYCOTOXIN ADSORBENTS UNDER IN VITRO CONDITIONS
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Keywords

ochratoxin A
deoxynivalenol
adsorbents
pyrophyllite
peach stones

How to Cite

1.
Krstović S, Guljaš D, Miljanić J, Damjanović M, Jajić I. POTENTIAL OF DIFFERENT MYCOTOXIN ADSORBENTS UNDER IN VITRO CONDITIONS. AVM [Internet]. 2023 Dec. 29 [cited 2024 Mar. 1];16(2):53-66. Available from: https://niv.ns.ac.rs/e-avm/index.php/e-avm/article/view/322

Abstract

Mycotoxins are a large and chemically diverse group of toxic secondary metabolites. Regarding their prevalence in animal feed and the effect on animal health, the biggest problems in terms of safety and economic losses are caused by aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes and zearalenone. Adsorbents are substances that are added to food contaminated with mycotoxins, in order to bind them in the gastrointestinal tract and thereby prevent or reduce their effect. The aim of this study was to examine the possibility of using pyrophyllite as a mineral adsorbent, as well as preparations made of ground peach pits of different particle sizes as organic adsorbents, for adsorption of deoxynivalenol and ochratoxin A. Mycotoxin adsorption experiments were performed in vitro in electrolyte solutions at pH 3 and 7. The adsorption efficiency of the adsorbent was expressed as adsorption index. Pyrophyllite had adsorption index ​​of 13.47% for ochratoxin A at pH 3, while at pH 7, as well as for deoxynivalenol, the same mycotoxin produced a negligible degree of adsorption. Ground peach stones (of larger diameter, d = 0.1 mm) had considerable adsorption rates for ochratoxin A at pH 3 (34.41%) and deoxynivalenol at pH 7 (18.57%). The values were similar for smaller diameter (d < 0.1 mm) for ochratoxin A at pH 3 (42.71%) and deoxynivalenol at pH 7 (20.11%). The obtained results suggest that the potential of the preparation of ground peach stones for the adsorption of tested mycotoxins is higher compared to the potential of pyrophyllite, but there are differences in their efficiency depending on the pH value of the adsorption environment.

https://doi.org/10.46784/e-avm.v16i2.322
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