THE MOST COMMON BACTERIAL ZOONOSES IN HUMANS IN THE VOJVODINA REGION (SERBIA) IN THE PERIOD 2005–2009
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How to Cite

1.
Hrnjaković Cvjetković I, Milošević V, Jerant Patić V, Stefan Mikić S, Cvjetković D, Radovanov J, Kovačević G. THE MOST COMMON BACTERIAL ZOONOSES IN HUMANS IN THE VOJVODINA REGION (SERBIA) IN THE PERIOD 2005–2009. AVM [Internet]. 2011 Jun. 28 [cited 2022 Aug. 15];4(1):11-8. Available from: https://niv.ns.ac.rs/e-avm/index.php/e-avm/article/view/174

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to emphasize the signifi cance of bacterial zoonoses in Vojvodina in the period 2005-2009. Th e study is based on data from the Health Statistical Yearbook of the Republic of Serbia published by the Institute of Public Health of Serbia “Dr Milan Jovanović Batut”. Bacterial zoonoses were represented with 1.16% (5610/482596) among the total number of registered bacterial zoonoses in Vojvodina 2005-2009. Among them the most frequent were salmonellosis with 62.83% (3525/5610). The incidence in Vojvodina in the period 2005-2009 ranged between 46.45-22.78 per 100,000 population. According to frequence Lyme disease was at second place with 19.20% (1077/5610) among the total number of registered bacterial zoonoses. Lyme disease in Vojvodina in the period 2005-2009 had an increasing trend: the number of reported cases increased from 164 in 2005 to 294 in 2009. According to the number of registered cases campylobacteriosis was at the third place - 794 cases (14.15%). Q fever was at the fourth place. Almost all cases of Q fever which were registered in Serbia, were from Vojvodina (92 of 93 cases). Other zoonoses in Vojvodina were represented with less than 2% of the total number of registered bacterial zoonoses: leptospirosis 1.10% (62/5610), brucellosis 0.48% (27/5610), tetanus 0.27% (15/5610), listeriosis 0.23% (13/5610), ornithosis 0.07% (4/5610), tularemia 0.02% (1/4816). The causative agents of bacterial zoonoses were important human pathogens in Vojvodina in the period 2005-2009. Among them the most common were Salmonella and Lyme disease.

https://doi.org/10.46784/e-avm.v4i1.174
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