KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITTUDES OF VETERINARY STUDENTS IN SERBIA TOWARD FARM ANIMAL WELFARE
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Keywords

attitudes
farm animals
students
welfare

How to Cite

1.
Nenadović K, Videnović D, Đorđević M, Đukić-Stojšić M, Vučinić M. KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITTUDES OF VETERINARY STUDENTS IN SERBIA TOWARD FARM ANIMAL WELFARE. AVM [Internet]. 2024 Jun. 22 [cited 2024 Jul. 19];17(1):69-87. Available from: https://niv.ns.ac.rs/e-avm/index.php/e-avm/article/view/380

Abstract

In this study, veterinary students from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade and Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Novi Sad were surveyed to evaluate their knowledge and attitudes toward farm animal welfare. Data were collected from 431 students by survey consisting of 39 closed-ended questions divided into two parts (demographic characteristics and a five-point Likert scale). Results showed that female students, students aged 18 to 21 years, from veterinary high schools, from urban areas, with mixed diets, who own pets, were predominated. Younger students and students from the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University in Belgrade agree significantly higher (p<0.001) that animal welfare is necessary for sustainable agriculture, food safety, biological functioning, emotional state, and natural behavior, as well as zootechnical procedures and rearing systems impairing the welfare of farm animals compared with students of the final year of studies, and from Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture in Novi Sad. Female students, and younger students, from urban areas, who own pets, have more concerned attitudes regarding farm animal welfare (p<0.001). The findings of this study confirm that attitudes toward farm animal welfare are not homogeneous and are associated with students’ demographic characteristics. Also, results suggest that more attention should be paid to the curriculum and program to indirectly improve the welfare of farm animals.

https://doi.org/10.46784/e-avm.v17i1.380
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