EVALUATION OF PHYSIOLOGICAL BIOMARKERS AS POSSIBLE PREDICTIVE FACTORS AND PROGNOSIS MARKERS OF KIDNEY INJURY IN DOGS NATURALLY INFECTED WITH LEISHMANIA INFANTUM
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Keywords

Acute kidney injury
CanL
survival

How to Cite

1.
da Costa-Val AP, Cambraia Veado JC, Ribeiro VM, Muniz dos Santos F. EVALUATION OF PHYSIOLOGICAL BIOMARKERS AS POSSIBLE PREDICTIVE FACTORS AND PROGNOSIS MARKERS OF KIDNEY INJURY IN DOGS NATURALLY INFECTED WITH LEISHMANIA INFANTUM. AVM [Internet]. 2023 Dec. 29 [cited 2024 Mar. 1];16(2):83-102. Available from: https://niv.ns.ac.rs/e-avm/index.php/e-avm/article/view/327

Abstract

Impaired renal function is one of the main characteristics of dogs infected with Leishmania infantum. Early diagnosis of kidney injury is essential for improving patient’s prognosis. This study aims to evaluate physiological biomarkers as predictors of kidney injury and prognostic markers. Medical records of fifty-nine dogs of different breed, age, and sex, naturally infected with L. infantum, were analyzed. Red blood cells, leucocytes, platelets count, hematocrit, total plasma proteins, plasma globulin, plasma albumin, serum creatinine, serum urea, serum phosphorus, serum symmetrical dimethyl arginine, urine analysis, urinary density, urinary protein creatinine ratio, urinary creatinine, urinary protein, and systemic blood pressure were examined in trial 0. Six months after trial 0, twenty-four dogs returned for clinical and laboratory examination. The second medical record analysis was identified as trial 1. The twenty-four dogs were examined using the same tests performed in trial 0. The physiological biomarker such as platelets and leukocyte count, hematocrit, serum phosphorus, urinary density, and systemic blood pressure, showed a significant correlation as prognostic and predictive factors of kidney injury in dogs. The platelet count was used as the physiological biomarker to show the value as a predictive factor and prognostic marker related to biomarkers of kidney injury in dogs naturally infected with L. infantum.

https://doi.org/10.46784/e-avm.v16i2.327
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