ISOLATION, MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION AND ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY OF SALMONELLA FROM BUFFALO FECES IN SYLHET DISTRICT OF BANGLADESH
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Keywords

Bangladesh
buffalo feces
Salmonella
invA gene
antibiotics sensitivity

How to Cite

1.
Dashgupta B, Rahman MM, Akter S, Begum R, Chowdhury MSR, Hossain MM. ISOLATION, MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION AND ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY OF SALMONELLA FROM BUFFALO FECES IN SYLHET DISTRICT OF BANGLADESH. AVM [Internet]. 2023 Dec. 29 [cited 2024 Mar. 1];16(2):67-81. Available from: https://niv.ns.ac.rs/e-avm/index.php/e-avm/article/view/317

Abstract

Salmonella is a widely distributed foodborne pathogen affecting humans and animals around the globe. This cross-sectional bacteriological study was aimed at isolation of Salmonella from fecal samples of buffalos in Sylhet district (Upazilas Jaintapur and Fenchuganj) of Bangladesh, their molecular confirmation, and learning their antibiotic sensitivity patterns. A total of 334 fecal samples were collected using a simple random sampling technique. Standard conventional bacteriological culture and biochemical tests were done to isolate and confirm Salmonella. The isolates were confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, Salmonella was isolated from 56 samples (16.77%) using bacteriological culture methods and biochemical tests, and all isolates were confirmed in PCR tests. The prevalence of Salmonella was estimated to be 17.57% and 13.93% in Jaintapur and Fenchuganj Upazilas, respectively. Buffalo calves under one year of age had a higher prevalence (24.32%) than older animals aged 1 - 2 (18.62%), 2 - 4 (13.25%), and > 4 years (10.67%). Furthermore, the prevalence was substantially higher in diarrheic animals (72.22%) than in their healthy counterparts (13.60%). It did not vary significantly (p > 0.05) between animals from Jaintapur and Fenchuganj Upazilas. Likewise, no significant difference (p > 0.05) in Salmonella isolates was detected between different age groups. The results revealed that the isolation rate of Salmonella was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in female and diarrheic animals. The most effective antibiotics against the majority of Salmonella isolates were gentamycin (100%), levofloxacin (100%), and ciprofloxacin (76.67%). On the other hand, Salmonella isolates were highly resistant to tetracycline (100%), ampicillin (87.5%), and streptomycin (78.6%). Pathogenic microorganisms in feces are a potential risk to public health due to environmental and animal food contamination. Therefore, infection control and establishing strategic antibiotic therapy should be a priority.

https://doi.org/10.46784/e-avm.v16i2.317
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